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Take your responsibility

Blog by Rob Gering, talent and leadership developer at ORMIT

Rob Gering .png

By Rob Gering

Talent and leadership developer at ORMIT

You see that something is going wrong. Because of your education, training and education, you have an opinion on the matter. Will you say something about it? As a professional, addressing what needs to be addressed simply isn't a choice, and yet... ….

Thinking about yourself

In practice, stepping out and making yourself heard can be difficult. Will people take you seriously? What if someone holds it against you? According to carrièretijger.nl, however, speaking out is generally experienced as a good thing and responsible employees are a blessing for an organisation. So why do so many professionals struggle with speaking out? Sometimes, your expertise might not be taken seriously enough, or professionals might take it to be unnecessary whining (don't professionals have the RIGHT to whine, though, as long as it's not for their own gain but for the business?). Time to think about yourself.

"Devote 80% of your attention to professional execution, professional development and your peers!"
Rob Gering .png

By Rob Gering

Talent and leadership developer at ORMIT

Three happy P's

It's all about motivating professionals! They love the three happy P's (based on Hans Vermaak's drie Vrolijke V's, 2017) professional execution, professional development and peers. The BBP of Bureaucracy, bosses and policy, however, aren't as well-liked. The work/profession is enjoyable: it makes you better and challenges you, and even though it's not always easy, work is rarely a source of demotivation. The BBP are subjected to more complaints: no matter how good their manager is, how great the salary structure, or how complete the policy plan, these factors will hardly even manage to enthuse professionals. How long can you spend working on the things you enjoy? And are your personal leadership skills up to the task? His advice: Devote 80% of your attention to professional execution, professional development and your peers!

There can be quite some confusion about this, especially in organisations staffed with professionals. Make sure that there's a lot of time & space to work on the three P's, even though nobody will expressly call for it. It will improve you as a professional and give you time to think about how you take responsibility for yourself and for the aspects of the organisation that you care about. Make sure that you'll be a professional blessing, whether they want you to or not.

Conclusion?

So, what can we conclude? Make sure that there's a lot of time and space to work on the three P's. Want to comment? Please do! 

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